The 90s in Berlin: “colorful, loud and unique,”

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Many compare the Berlin of the 90s with the New York of the ‘ 70s. The whole city is a Playground for art and night life. Exotic, unpredictable, and productive. An exhibition reminiscent of the wild time.

  • Techno and occupied houses: exhibition “the Nineties in Berlin”

    Ecstasy without Limit

    No curfew, but a lot of fallow industrial halls: The re-United Berlin was made for big Party nights in abandoned basements. It was the birth of the Techno scene-for a lot of DJ’s career began in the legendary night clubs like the “Tresor”. A tribute to the Raves of the Nineties this historic platter is in the exhibition “the Nineties in Berlin”.

  • Techno and occupied houses: exhibition “the Nineties in Berlin”

    Free space for Creative

    Concerts, theatre, readings, art works, and debates: In the “Kunsthaus Tacheles” were no limits to creativity. In 1990, an artists ‘ initiative-encrusted ruins on the Oranienburger Straße has developed in the course of the decade to a cultural Institution. In September 2012, the remaining artists had to vacate the premises after a year-long dispute once and for all.

  • Techno and occupied houses: exhibition “the Nineties in Berlin”

    The Nineties in pictures

    It is impressive, moving shots, which can see visitors of the exhibition “the Nineties in Berlin” in this room on a 270-degree screen. The original photos and video clips are accompanied by a “Soundtrack to a decade”. The journey of discovery through the nineties, leading from the night of the fall of the Berlin wall, to the rapid development of the Loveparade.

  • Techno and occupied houses: exhibition “the Nineties in Berlin”

    From the scene and taken to a mass event

    “Peace, joy, pancakes” – so the Motto of the first love parade in 1989 was. On the Ku’damm in Berlin, 150 techno fans took at the time, just once. In just a few years, the event has developed from the scene and taken to one of the largest musical Events in Europe. The last love parade ended in 2010 in Duisburg, Germany, in tragedy, with 21 dead and hundreds injured due to a mass panic.

  • Techno and occupied houses: exhibition “the Nineties in Berlin”

    Dragon head on tour

    Instead of Techno, the Band Rammstein in the nineties with rock music became internationally known. The cult band had been founded in Berlin in 1994. To your “desire”-Tour 1997, the musicians took a fire-breathing dragon head. As an impressive exhibit of this now hangs over the heads of the visitors of the exhibition in Berlin. According to rumors, Rammstein 2018 put out a new Album.

  • Techno and occupied houses: exhibition “the Nineties in Berlin”

    Time witnesses remember

    For the exhibition “the Nineties in Berlin” led by curator Michael Geithner witnesses, a total of 13 Interviews with time. “Through the personal voices of the nineties are experienced, than it would have been myself,” says Geithner. Among the respondents are also well-known personalities such as the singer of the Band 2Raumwohnung-Inga Humpe.

  • Techno and occupied houses: exhibition “the Nineties in Berlin”

    Creative capture of Berlin-Mitte

    Pop icon, Inga Humpe, was one of many Westerners who moved there after the fall of Berlin-Mitte. The newly discovered district was culturally considered a blank slate. The many unrenovated, thread plate buildings were taken over by Creative in fitting. Between the use of the word of the hour. Everywhere opened week bars, the ausschenkten only on a certain day in the week.

  • Techno and occupied houses: exhibition “the Nineties in Berlin”

    Whom the wall claimed the lives of

    This Installation from Kalashnikovs to commemorate the 140 victims of the wall, the lost between 1961 and 1989 their lives in the attempt to overcome the border between East – and West-Berlin. The exhibition of the victim intends to call their names and biographies. Not all were killed by machine guns, some were drowned in the boundary waters, or plunged into the death.

    Author: Paula Roesler


  • Techno and occupied houses: exhibition “the Nineties in Berlin”

    Ecstasy without Limit

    No curfew, but a lot of fallow industrial halls: The re-United Berlin was made for big Party nights in abandoned basements. It was the birth of the Techno scene-for a lot of DJ’s career began in the legendary night clubs like the “Tresor”. A tribute to the Raves of the Nineties this historic platter is in the exhibition “the Nineties in Berlin”.

  • Techno and occupied houses: exhibition “the Nineties in Berlin”

    Free space for Creative

    Concerts, theatre, readings, art works, and debates: In the “Kunsthaus Tacheles” were no limits to creativity. In 1990, an artists ‘ initiative-encrusted ruins on the Oranienburger Straße has developed in the course of the decade to a cultural Institution. In September 2012, the remaining artists had to vacate the premises after a year-long dispute once and for all.

  • Techno and occupied houses: exhibition “the Nineties in Berlin”

    The Nineties in pictures

    It is impressive, moving shots, which can see visitors of the exhibition “the Nineties in Berlin” in this room on a 270-degree screen. The original photos and video clips are accompanied by a “Soundtrack to a decade”. The journey of discovery through the nineties, leading from the night of the fall of the Berlin wall, to the rapid development of the Loveparade.

  • Techno and occupied houses: exhibition “the Nineties in Berlin”

    From the scene and taken to a mass event

    “Peace, joy, pancakes” – so the Motto of the first love parade in 1989 was. On the Ku’damm in Berlin, 150 techno fans took at the time, just once. In just a few years, the event has developed from the scene and taken to one of the largest musical Events in Europe. The last love parade ended in 2010 in Duisburg, Germany, in tragedy, with 21 dead and hundreds injured due to a mass panic.

  • Techno and occupied houses: exhibition “the Nineties in Berlin”

    Dragon head on tour

    Instead of Techno, the Band Rammstein in the nineties with rock music became internationally known. The cult band had been founded in Berlin in 1994. To your “desire”-Tour 1997, the musicians took a fire-breathing dragon head. As an impressive exhibit of this now hangs over the heads of the visitors of the exhibition in Berlin. According to rumors, Rammstein 2018 put out a new Album.

  • Techno and occupied houses: exhibition “the Nineties in Berlin”

    Time witnesses remember

    For the exhibition “the Nineties in Berlin” led by curator Michael Geithner witnesses, a total of 13 Interviews with time. “Through the personal voices of the nineties are experienced, than it would have been myself,” says Geithner. Among the respondents are also well-known personalities such as the singer of the Band 2Raumwohnung-Inga Humpe.

  • Techno and occupied houses: exhibition “the Nineties in Berlin”

    Creative capture of Berlin-Mitte

    Pop icon, Inga Humpe, was one of many Westerners who moved there after the fall of Berlin-Mitte. The newly discovered district was culturally considered a blank slate. The many unrenovated, thread plate buildings were taken over by Creative in fitting. Between the use of the word of the hour. Everywhere opened week bars, the ausschenkten only on a certain day in the week.

  • Techno and occupied houses: exhibition “the Nineties in Berlin”

    Whom the wall claimed the lives of

    This Installation from Kalashnikovs to commemorate the 140 victims of the wall, the lost between 1961 and 1989 their lives in the attempt to overcome the border between East – and West-Berlin. The exhibition of the victim intends to call their names and biographies. Not all were killed by machine guns, some were drowned in the boundary waters, or plunged into the death.

    Author: Paula Roesler


As one of four curators Michael Geithner has developed the Multimedia exhibition “the Nineties in Berlin”, in cooperation with the DDR Museum in Berlin. In a DW Interview, he tells of the unique charm of the nineties, velvet party-happy Eastern Berlin, this colourful places, Hooligans and squatters. The Exhibition runs until the 28. February 2019 in the Alte Münze, a former mint factory in Berlin-Mitte.

Deutsche Welle: Mr. Geithner, the exhibition “the Nineties in Berlin” wants to return visitors in the Berlin of the nineties. Why now?

Michael Geithner: It’s just time for it. Now almost thirty years have passed, a whole Generation is indented. There is a time interval. Spatially, a lot has changed. A lot of people who have experienced Berlin in the nineties, after thinking about this time and have the need the events to work on.

Us in the DDR Museum was also keen to tell the story about the fall of the wall. Just because Germany was reunited, was not completed in this time, Yes.

Can remember so well the mid-nineties – a quote from a colleague: “As if it were yesterday”. The today 18-Year-olds, however, the decade did not have witnessed. How does the exhibition, both groups equally?

This is always a challenge, but I think it worked. The youth of today can build on many of the topics of at the time. Whether it is Berlin’s Clubs, or the music that is heard. The youthful optimism of that time fascinated by the young Generation: there is freedom you wish, if the school is over. For example, in a new city where the rent costs a lot. These topics are a good starting point to go in depth about it.

For the exhibition, we have also developed a Guide Bot for Smartphone. Visitors can access to over 200 information texts and images, so thematically there go into the Detail, where you want to.

The exhibition of the Berlin-based Club dedicated to and cultural scene of the nineties, a space of their own. What can visitors experience?

This space is called “Lost in Berlin”. Visitors wander through a maze and find all of the colourful places that no longer exist in this Form today, in the blind alleys. For this purpose, the Techno-Club “Tresor” and the first great East-Berlin Raves of the party series “Tekknozid”. Also places such as the “Kunsthaus Tacheles” and the legendary cultural venue “IN the bucket” you can experience there. The Whole thing culminates in a small mirror room, which is dedicated to the love parade.

Why were the nineties for Berlin’s creative scene, particularly formative?

Because so much is happening. The love parade is about to explode. In 1989, 150 people were there. In the following year, already twice as many, and more and more of them. For the exhibition we have a number of DJ WestBam (one of the most important DJs of the first techno-generation Anm. the Red.) when time interviewed the witnesses. He said that without East-Berlin, the whole Techno-batch culture would be a very small thing remained. After the wall came down, the East Berlin partywütig in the West, and the Clubs full.

Also, the Berlin wall is an integral part of the exhibition. Visitors can climb to, for example, pieces of the wall, and Selfies from the top. At the same time is reminiscent of the many victims of the wall. How was the Berlin wall in the nineties?

It was important for us, the issue is not to exclude. When the wall was gone, there were in Berlin, and suddenly this green strip that ran through the city. A free space is created, you didn’t really start something. This has affected the entire life.

In the minds of the wall of it was of course still there. The processing of the divided city, with hovered in the nineties. As curators, we were faced with the challenge to develop a powerful staging, and to remind others of the 140 victims of the wall. The biographies of these people and the circumstances of her death are told in various texts.

In addition to WestBam you have interviewed twelve witnesses for the exhibition. What have you taken in the choice of the people?

This was a difficult process, because the completeness is never. To me it was very important to have a diversity of voices. Under the time-both well-known personalities with a lighthouse effect, such as, for example, Inga Humpe, Gregor Gysi, or WestBam as they are. But we also wanted to tell the simple stories that are representative of larger processes.

For Example?

I find it particularly exciting is the story of a former Hooligan who was at the time in the scene is very active. But also the full view of a police officer from the same neighborhood, who has witnessed the whole confrontation between Hooligans, Nazis, squatters and the police. These stories are incredibly touching and a perfect example of how crazy this time was.

Speaking of crazy, what three words would you use to describe the Generation of 2000, plus the early nineties in Berlin?

Colorful, loud and unique.

What is missing from the Berlin of today compared to the nineties?

Berlin is today faced with the question: What are you? The city can boast of, “poor but sexy”, as it was perhaps the beginning of the Nineties of the case. Although the myth of this time is tried again and again. But I don’t think Berlin is the. The city should actively work to create spaces for artists, students and young people, affordable housing, but also a place for political debates. Berlin may not stay completely sold out.

The conversation Paula Rösler.